What led to the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

What led to the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

What led to the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

The murder of voting-rights activists in Mississippi and the attack by state troopers on peaceful marchers in Selma, AL, gained national attention and persuaded President Johnson and Congress to initiate meaningful and effective national voting rights legislation.

What is Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act?

When Congress enacted the Voting Rights Act of 1965, it determined that racial discrimination in voting had been more prevalent in certain areas of the country. Section 4(a) of the Act established a formula to identify those areas and to provide for more stringent remedies where appropriate.

When did the voting rights pass?

On August 4, 1965, the United States Senate passed the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Why was the Voting Rights Act created?

Voting Rights Act, U.S. legislation (August 6, 1965) that aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote under the Fifteenth Amendment (1870) to the Constitution of the United States.

What is in the Voting Rights Act?

The law put an end to literacy tests, which prevented many people from registering to vote, in a half-dozen states, granted the attorney general the power to send observers to witness elections and gave the federal government the authority to preapprove voting and election changes in places with a history of …

When was the Voting Rights Act extended?

1975
In 1975, the special provisions of the Voting Rights Act were extended for another seven years, and were broadened to address voting discrimination against members of “language minority groups.” An additional coverage formula was enacted, based on the presence of tests or devices and levels of voter registration and …

Who created the Voting Rights Act?

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was introduced in Congress on March 17, 1965, as S. 1564, and it was jointly sponsored by Senate majority leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT) and Senate minority leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL), both of whom had worked with Attorney General Katzenbach to draft the bill’s language.