Where is Cornelia Hesse-Honegger from?

Where is Cornelia Hesse-Honegger from?

Where is Cornelia Hesse-Honegger from?

Zurich
A Zurich-based artist and scientific illustrator, Hesse-Honegger has been peering into microscopes and drawing malformed insects for decades.

What does cornelia Hesse-Honegger do?

Cornelia Hesse-Honegger works at the interface between art and science. An exhibitor in Bugs, Beauty and Danger, She aims to testify to the beauties of an increasingly endangered nature.

Are there insects in Chernobyl?

In contrast to the large carnivores and other big fauna, bugs and spiders have seen a big drop in their numbers. A 2009 study in Biology Letters indicated that the more radiation there was in certain locations around the Chernobyl disaster area, the lower the population of invertebrates.

Are radioactive bugs real?

Although enormous radioactive bugs would make for a cool movie or comic book, in real life it seems that exposure to radioactivity only results in trivial mutations in bugs if it does not outright kill entire insect and spider populations.

Are bugs attracted to radiation?

Based on the data presented above, it is generally accepted that UV radiation attracts insects. However, this apparent attraction could result from two distinct mechanisms.

What did Cornelia Hesse-Honegger do for a living?

Describing herself as a ā€˜science artist,ā€™ she worked for 25 years, as a scientific illustrator for the Natural History Museum at the University of Zurich. From 1969 onwards, she collected and painted true bugs, Heteroptera.

When did Cornelia Hesse-Honegger become an illustrator?

As a scientific illustrator I had worked for Prof. Hans Burla, a geneticist at the Zoological Institute of the University of Zurich. In 1967 he gave me the assignment to draw Drosophila subobscura flies that had been mutated in the laboratory by adding a poison (EMS) to their food.

Why did Cornelia Hesse-Honegger start the Atomic Photographers Guild?

It moves in the border between art and science and wants to present insects as a testimony to a beautiful and threatened world of life. As a scientific illustrator I had worked for Prof. Hans Burla, a geneticist at the Zoological Institute of the University of Zurich.

Where did Cornelia Hesse-Honegger find the squash bug?

Hesse-Honegger notes that the right wings are disturbed and the scutellum is bent. A squash bug Coreus marginatus from Polesskoje, Ukraine, found August 15, 1990. “The left feeler lacks a section and is shorter,” says Hesse-Honegger.